Forum

Ayaka Tanimoto

The Operosa Forum is dedicated to promoting dynamic classical music and opera talent

Ayaka Tanimoto

Singer/Mezzo

Originally from Japan, Ayaka relocated to London in 2005 and subsequently graduated from Royal College of Music with a Bachelor of Music (BMus Hons) in 2009 and a Masters in Vocal Performance (MPerf) in 2011. Studies under Margaret Cable and Patricia Rozario OBE were supported by scholarships from Japan. In July 2014, Ayaka graduated as a Scholar from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Alexander Gibson Opera School where she sang the main role of Sesto in Mozart's La Clemenza di Tito.
Ayaka has won numerous awards in Japan and UK, including the crowning achievement of 1st prize at the 3rd International Ernest Bloch Competition in London, UK. To date, Ayaka has taken to the stage as a recitalist in a number of highly regarded venues throughout UK such as the Purcell Room, National Gallery, King’s Place, St. Martin in the Fields, St. James’ Piccadilly, Portsmouth Cathedral, and Bristol Cathedral to name but a few.
Ayaka has sung with opera companies such as Longborough Opera Festival, British Youth Opera, Opéra de Baugé France, Kent Opera, Bury Court Opera, Opera Holland Park, and Osaka Philharmonic Orchestra on Tour.
To date, Ayaka has taken to the opera stage singing 2nd boy and 2nd Lady in Mozart's Magic Flute (Longborough Festival Opera & LFO Tour), Iolanthe in G&S's Iolanthe (Brent Opera), covering Darabella in Mozart's Cosi fan tutte (Opera de Baugé), Poppet in Benjamin Britten's Paul Bunyan (British Youth Opera), Flora Bervoix in Verdi's La Traviata (Opera Lyrica& Kent Opera), Suzuki in Puccini's Madama Butterfly (Bury Court Opera and Grimeborn Festival), and Žena and Chorus in Janáček’s Káťa Kabanová (Opera Holland Park).

Furthermore, her chorus experience lies with renowned conductors such as Bernard Haitink (Bruckner's Te Deum), Michael Rosewell (RCM BBIOS Opera Production of Bartered Bride and Cosi fan Tutte), Martin André (Beethoven's Symphony 9th and Britten's War Requiem), and Leif Segerstam (Brahms' Requiem).
Reviews
Madame Butterfly- Bury Court Opera

The natural elegance and marvelous subtle acting of the Suzuki, Ayaka Tanimoto, were matched by a cushioned, contralto-like timbre. (Opera Magazine)
Ayaka Tanimoto’s Suzuki alone could have held the stage, and the audience, mesmerized. This was a gorgeous, possibly unusual, mezzo, laden with undertow so that her every utterance gained in expressiveness. Her moves seemed natural, though obviously were partly stylized: her prayerful caution offset to splendid effect the youthful optimism of her younger charge. (Seen and Heard International)
Madame Butterfly- Grimeborn Festival
Ayaka Tanimoto wasn’t your usual Suzuki – no mothering of Butterfly or waspish flying at slippery marriage-broker Goro. Tanimoto was the devoted servant, a portrait of quiet dignity, with a light, pliant mezzo that sounded most beautiful. (Bachtrack)
La Clemenza di Tito- RCS
The young Japanese mezzo Ayaka Tanimoto was a delightful surprise as Sesto. Slim and boyish looking, with a beautiful sweet-toned voice, she gave lovely accounts of her arias.
 (Opera Scotland)
Singing honours of the evening went to Japanese mezzo-soprano Ayaka Tanimoto as Sesto, who made performing Mozart seem effortless and completely natural with her hauntingly beautiful voice and strong stage presence.(Bachtrack)
the glowing high points of Ayaka Tanimoto’s Sesto...A challenge well met.(Scotsman) Il ritorno d'Ulisse- RCS


Ayaka Tanimoto finds a beguiling voice for Melanto. (Herald Scotland)
Paul Bunyan- British Youth Opera
Emily Vine, Grace Durham and Ayaka Tanimoto were the camp pets, Fido, Moppet and Poppet, with Britten and Auden binding highly imaginative ways to use the three roles and Vine, Durham and Tanimoto did not disappoint. (Planet Hugill)
Magic Flute- Longborough Opera Festival
---and above all, the ever-present (a Longborough hallmark) attentions of the Three Spirits, among whom Ayaka Tanimoto brought the most attractive stage-presence I can remember in a long time. (Birmingham Post)